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Motes MOTES
by Craig Dworkin

Craig Dworkin's "Motes" imitates a form created by Bob Grenier in A Day at the Beach and Sentences. As Grenier says in the "Afterword" - "What’s wrong with our Community of Poets, such that each next 'new one' has to be so studiously/stylistically ('New'), Idiosyncratic…?" The wonder of the form is how Dworkin inquires into the relationship of title and content as in the conditional

WOODS

thick carpet of leaves would be so
good for slipping if you’re a deer

Or his oblique review of the Iraq War

              DARFUR

              Hens

Dworkin helps reposition us on the planet near here and over there. The poems are minimal but fully reentrant, that is, going at them again and again does not repeat.

Craig Dworkin's Motes is an unexpected delight of sparse poems that glitter, provoke, and beg for completeness. These pieces show Dworkin’s impressive range as he travels seamlessly into the reshaping of literary minimalism. Even though many of his conceptual works have echoed minimalist ideals, Motes shifts into a more distilled frame, where both author and reader slide over a tiny handful of words only to arrive at other ends of the world: "BRICK / Buick." Each parcel is as hard and unstable as the gravel under our feet. - Robert Fitterman

In Motes, Craig Dworkin rejects the Thumbelina umbra of koan or apothegm for a minority smaller than scale of focus. If the book turns telegram hefty classics of philosophy and literature (some merely suggestive of their hautes sources), its verbal quarks quirkily sidestep essence for sidelong banter and bathos (viz. "REMEMBERING LAST TIME"), as well as playfully hooke and skewer better-known modernist micrograffiti (e.g. "PARIS TRAIN STATION"). Motes"s formidable, multi-literate wordplay—working aurality as hard as it does reference, invoking traditions from haiku to Saroyan to serialism to Bob Brown"s "readies"—reveals just how many angles may needlingly co-hab a pointillistic verse, the duckings a rabbit may take. - Judith Goldman

84 pages
ISBN: 978-1-931824-44-6
Publication date: April 2011

$14.95 - Paperback
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$3.99 - Kindle Edition
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The Consequence of Innovation THE CONSEQUENCE OF INNOVATION: 21ST CENTURY POETICS
by Craig Dworkin, Ed.

Dworkin has edited a collection of amazing new essays on poetics, summarizing the variety of poetries that have arisen in innovative writing during the past 10 years. Filling the gap that has arisen in publishing writing on new poetry, there are essays on computer programs as poems by Brian Kim Stefans, flarf poetics by Gary Sullivan and Michael Gottlieb, uncreative poetry by Kenneth Goldsmith, and environmental poetry by James Sherry. There are essays on playwright Fiona Templeton and a groundbreaking piece by Sianne Ngai centered on Gertrude Stein. There is also an important group of general essays on the poetry marketplace by Steve Evans, Charles Bernstein, and Marjorie Perloff. If you buy one book this year, buy this one.

About the author: Craig Dworkin is the author of Reading the Illegible (Northwestern UP), Signature-Effects (Ghos-Ti), Dure (Cuneiform), Strand (Roof), and Parse (Atelos), and the editor of Architectures of Poetry (Rodopi) and Language to Cover a Page: The Early Writing of Vito Acconci (MIT). He teaches at the University of Utah and curates two on-line archives: Eclipse and The UbuWeb Anthology of Conceptual Writing.

301 pages
ISBN: 978-1-931824-29-3
Publication date: May 2008

$29.95

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Strand STRAND
by Craig Dworkin

"Craig Dworkin produces a poetry rich and strange, a counterpart of French Oulipo but with a characteristically American pragmatic inflection. Dworkin takes seriously Wittgenstein's axiom that there are no gaps in grammar, that everything is already there if we will only see the connections"
- Marjorie Perloff

Craig Dworkin is the author of Reading the Illegible (Northwestern UP), Signature-Effects (Ghos-Ti), Dure (Cuneiform), Strand (Roof), and Parse (Atelos), and the editor of Architectures of Poetry (Rodopi) and Language to Cover a Page: The Early Writing of Vito Acconci (MIT). He teaches at the University of Utah and curates two on-line archives: Eclipse and The UbuWeb Anthology of Conceptual Writing.

102 pages
ISBN: 978-1-931824-14-9
Publication date: Novwember 2005

$12.95

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